News

5/31/2019

By Lori Adams

The University of Kentucky has released its Dean's List for the spring 2019 semester. A total of 6,562 students were recognized for their outstanding academic performance. 

To make a Dean’s List in one of the UK colleges, a student must earn a grade-point average of 3.6 or higher and must have earned 12 credits or more in that semester, excluding credits earned in pass-fail classes. Some UK colleges require a 3.5 GPA to make the Dean’s List.

The full Dean's List can be accessed by visiting: www.uky.edu/PR/News/DeansList/.

5/1/2019

By Jenny Wells

Award recipients, left to right: Madeline Dunfee, Katherine Love, Anna Branduzzi and Carson Benn. Photo courtesy of the UK Appalachian Center

The University of Kentucky Appalachian Centerhonored nine students last week with its annual research awards. Four graduate students received the James S. Brown Graduate Student Award for Research on Appalachia, and four graduate students and one undergraduate student received the center's Eller and Billings Student Research Award. 

"This summer, the James S. Brown and Eller/Billings Awards will sponsor students from seven different departments across four colleges," said Kathryn Engle, associate director of the Appalachian Center. "Innovative research across disciplines is thriving in the region, and the Appalachian

4/15/2019

By Catherine Hayden

The Kentucky Diversity Film Festival, which celebrates UK filmmakers is a three-day event, April 16-18 on campus.

The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee is sponsoring the Kentucky Diversity Film Festival, which celebrates UK filmmakers in a three-day event, April 16-18 on campus.

The Kentucky Diversity Film Festival kicks off 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 16, with a showcase of student film work in the new state-of-the art Worsham Cinema in the Gatton Student Center. The screening will be followed by an awards ceremony for the top student work.

On Wednesday, April 17, see “The Last Gospel of the Pagan Babies,” directed by UK art history and film criticism alumna Jean Donahue. The film tells the story of Lexington’s vibrant

3/27/2019

By Ellie Wnek

Although separated by thousands of miles, an ocean and most of continental Europe, the Appalachian-Carpathian International Conference will bring scholars together to discuss important issues that affect both Appalachian and Carpathian mountain communities.

The 2019 conference will take place in Brasov and Petrosani, Romania, Oct. 7-11, 2019. The conference is titled "Making Place: Transitional and Post-Industrial Development in Mountain Communities." The program committee is currently accepting proposals for plenary and concurrent sessions. Topics range from cultural preservation and folklore to sustainable agriculture and forestry to community development and economic diversification.

Possible formats include:

individual scholarly research papers or sessions; films, documentaries, videos and musical
2/25/2019

By Rebecca Longo

Students at last year's symposium.

The University of Kentucky Appalachian Center, Appalachian Studies Program and the Graduate Appalachian Research Community (GARC) will host the 10th annual Appalachian Research Symposium and Arts Showcase 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2, at the William T. Young Library UK Athletics Auditorium. The title of this year's event is "GARC at 10: Interdisciplinary Dialogues on Appalachian Research & Community."

"The Symposium and Arts Showcase is an important opportunity for both graduate and undergraduate students to share their work with peers who are also doing work in the

2/8/2019

Kentucky Kernel
by Noah Oldham

2/4/2019

By Ellie Wnek

The "Conversations with Gurney" speaker series will host Robert Gipe, author and illustrator of two critically acclaimed novels, "Trampoline" and "Weedeater," that focus on the people and hardships of the Appalachian region. Photo by Meaghan Evans.

The University of Kentucky Appalachian Center's "Conversations with Gurney" program will welcome esteemed author and Appalachian advocate Robert Gipe for a book reading and discussion this Thursday. The free, public event will be held 5-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, in the James F. Hardymon Theater in the Davis Marksbury Building. 

Gurney Norman, scholar-in-residence at the UK Appalachian Center, said, "It's so good for this community to have access

1/31/2019

By Lindsey Piercy

Gurney Norman and Ed McClanahan. Photo by Guy Mendes.

Two prolific writers and educators, with ties to the University of Kentucky, will soon add another title to their impressive resumes. The Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning has chosen Gurney Norman and Ed McClanahan as this year’s living inductees into the Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame. In addition, former UK Department of English professor Jane Gentry Vance will be inducted posthumously. 

Though accomplished in their own rights — Norman and McClanahan, who are longtime friends, both have literary careers focused on autobiographical fiction, and they both draw inspiration from their

1/28/2019

The UK Appalachian Center is proud to announce awards and funding opportunities for the Spring 2019 semester. Applications for the 2019 James S. Brown Graduate Student Award for Research on Appalachia are due February 15, 2019. Applications for the 2019 UK Appalachian Center Eller & Billings Student Research Award are due March 1, 2019. Applications for the James S. Brown Award that are NOT funded will automatically be entered into the competition for the 2019 UK Appalachian Center Eller & Billings Student Research Award. 

We are also proud to announce UK Appalachian Center's travel funding opportunities to

10/31/2018

By Meg Mills

"Williamsburg Urban Revitalization Studio Collage" by Emily Preece.

At 500 million years old, Appalachia is one of the oldest environments on Earth. It stretches from southern New York through northern Mississippi. The region contains the entire state of West Virginia and portions of 12 other states including Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

The University of Kentucky College of Design sits on the doorstep of Appalachia. Proximity to the region inspired the College of Design to establish Studio Appalachia as a catalyst for a positive change by means of community engagement. Studio Appalachia pursues design research projects that address issues that have confronted the Appalachia region for decades.

10/3/2018

By Sarah Jayne Johnson

The University of Kentucky John Jacob Niles Center for American Music’s "Appalachia in the Bluegrass" will welcome Sparky and Rhonda Rucker and Stray Local to campus this October to continue the concert series. Storyteller and multi-instrumentalist Sparky Rucker and his wife, musician Rhonda Rucker, will perform Oct. 5. The following week, indie band Stray Local will play Oct. 12. The free public concerts, which begin at noon, will be presented at the Niles Gallery in the Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

Old-Time ‘Ruck’us

 

Sparky and Rhonda

9/26/2018

By Carl Nathe

Christopher Barton with stream monitoring equipment in Robinson Forest. Photo by Matt Barton, UK Ag Communications.

The University of Kentucky’s Christopher Barton (principal investigator) and Kenton Sena (co-principal investigator) recently were  awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to modernize the stream monitoring network at UK’s Robinson Forest in southeastern Kentucky. This project will upgrade the existing network to enhance both data quality and data accessibility. Currently, the monitoring equipment is old and technologically obsolete, and requires a significant amount of upkeep time for data collection and processing.

Sena, who earned his Ph.D. from the 

9/21/2018

By Olivia Ramirez and Kody Kiser

 

As the university for Kentucky, understanding and addressing the health needs of the people of the Commonwealth is the goal of many faculty, staff, clinicians and researchers. As a step toward improving health equity in the Commonwealth, the University of Kentucky Center for Health Equity Transformation (CHET) was established during the 2018 Board of Trustees meeting. 

On this episode of Behind the Blue, CHET director Nancy Schoenberg and associate director Carrie Oser discuss how, through research and training, CHET will increase the number of researchers and the amount of health-equity focused research at UK.

"[Kentucky] is one of several states where we see declines in life expectancy so there is a lot of work to be done. We believe that research can help inform the best practices that can support improvements in

9/21/2018

By Danielle Donham

 The University of Kentucky Appalachian Center (UKAC) will be hosting an open house celebration from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, at its location on 624 Maxwelton Court. The recently-appointed associate director of the center and Appalachian Studies Program, Kathryn Engle, and new Scholar-in-Residence Gurney Norman will be on hand for a gathering filled with refreshments, entertainment, music and tours. This event is free and open to the community, UK students, faculty and staff members.

Food will be provided at the event with a short welcome presentation kicking off at noon. The open house will provide a chance to visit and learn about the work of the

9/20/2018

By Ellie Wnek

 

Watch Andrew Finn Magill perform a couple Irish tunes above.

Fiddle music will fill campus as the "Appalachia in the Bluegrass" concert series presents performances by Andrew Finn Magill and Emily Miller and Jesse Milnes. On Friday, Sept. 21, fiddler Finn Magill will perform. The next week, Friday, Sept. 28, country and old-time duo Miller and Milnes will play. These free public concerts will take place at noon, at the Niles Gallery, located in the University of Kentucky Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

'Finn the Fiddler'

Raised in Asheville, North

9/6/2018

By Danielle Donham

 

Don Pedi talks about learning to play the dulcimer for dulcimercrossing.com.

The next performances in the "Appalachia in the Bluegrass" concert series showcase the sounds, artistry and talents of Kentucky's Suffragists and Don Pedi. On Friday, Sept. 7, the Women's Suffrage Centennial Chorus will perform. The next week, Friday, Sept. 14, dulcimer musician Don Pedi will play. Both free public concerts will take place at noon, at the Niles Gallery, located in the University of Kentucky Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

8/29/2018

By Sarah Jayne Johnson

 

The Other Years perform "Red Tailed Hawk" for "Lost River Sessions" presented by WKYU-TV.

This fall the "Appalachia in the Bluegrass" concert series will return to University of Kentucky's campus. Starting Friday, Aug. 31, the series of free public concerts will kick off at noon, in the Niles Gallery of the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music, located at UK's Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center. The opening act is folk duo The Other Years.

Heather Summers and Anna Krippenstapel of The Other Years are both originally from Louisville, Kentucky. They were neighbors growing up

8/23/2018

By Lindsey Piercy

The University of Kentucky strives to be a place where people of all backgrounds are welcome. Students, faculty and staff come from different cities, states and countries — creating a truly diverse campus.

Linguistics, the study of language, is one way to measure diversity. It doesn't just have to be a foreign language, there's also diversity within the English language. For example, when referring to soft drinks, do you call them "coke" or "pop"? The answer speaks volumes about where you're from.

A fascinating project, initiated by Jennifer Cramer and Kevin McGowan, faculty members of the Department of Linguistics in the College of Arts & Sciences, aims to capture the various voices of UK. The venture, dubbed Wildcat Voices, started nearly two years ago and continues to gain

2/28/2018

By Gail Hairston and Kathy Johnson

Karen Rignall of the University of Kentucky has received a $50,000 Whiting Foundation Public Engagement Fellowship to pursue her research “Stories of Place in a Changing Appalachia,” a project in Eastern Kentucky, to bring “stories of place” and other traditions to bear on local land-use planning.

The Whiting Foundation announced yesterday (Tuesday) a new cohort of seven Whiting Public Engagement Fellowships, including Rignall’s, to showcase how the humanities enrich our lives.

In a written statement, Whiting Foundation leaders declared, “Never before has an understanding of history, philosophy, literature, and culture been so important. The humanities — too often underappreciated outside of academia — bring to bear careful inquiry and deep context, and help us absorb the

6/30/2017

By Gail Hairston

The sweet strains of traditional mountain music still drift on the summer breezes of the Appalachians, reflecting off the hills and flowing through the valleys. 

But before Appalachian mountain music was first preserved on wax discs — as the arid winds of the Dust Bowl blew and the soup lines of the Great Depression grew — the musicians played on handmade fiddles, dulcimers, zithers and mandolins, and heard with the hearts of generations.

Until the mid-19th century, the vast majority of musical instruments responsible for the sound of mountain music — dulcimers, guitars, violins or fiddles, banjoes, zithers and mandolins — were handmade and passed down from one generation to the next. The tunes and musical traditions were the inheritance of a melding of English, Welsh, Irish and Scottish ballads with the customs of Germany, Eastern Europe and

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