anthropology

Jacob Welch Receives The XXXIX National Lambda Alpha Scholarship Award

In the fall of 2014, I will begin doctoral studies in anthropology at Yale University. This ambition to further advance my education in archaeology was forged while completing my baccalaureate degree at the University of Kentucky.

Fellowship Awards Presented by Association of Emeriti Faculty

University of Kentucky Association of Emeriti Faculty (UKAEF) presented fellowship awards to three UK graduate students at a ceremony Feb. 10. Each award includes a stipend of $2,500.

From South Africa to Appalachia, The Power of Resilience and Community

Anthropology alumna Jasmine Newman is using her bachelor's degree in cultural and applied anthropology to strengthen communities in South Africa and Appalachia.

Long Time Ago... A Performance by Crit Callebs Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

 
Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.
 
Date: 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
The Niles Gallery -- Lucille Fine Arts Library

We're All Friends Here

Introducing the book: Landesque Capital: The Historical Ecology of Enduring Landscape Transformations.


 

Date: 
Friday, October 3, 2014 - 4:15pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 213
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Gov. Steve Beshear proclaims September as Kentucky Archaeology Month

The proclamation credits the Kentucky Office of State Archaeology, located within UK's Department of Anthropology, and the Kentucky Heritage Council/State Historic Preservation Office for maintaining an extensive and growing database of thousands of archaeological sites across the state.

They Preserve the Past for the Future

Adjunct Assistant Professors A. Gwynn Henderson and David Pollack have been award this year's Ida Lee Willis Memorial Award for outstanding commitment to historical preservation.

"Reflections on March 11, 2011: Japan's Disasters and their Aftermath" - AGSA Distinguished Lecture Series

In the wake of the triple disasters of March 11, 2011 which devastated the Tohoku region of Japan with a massive earthquake, an enormous set of tsunami, and the catastrophic failure of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor, both Japanese and foreign observers struggled to make sense of these events.  Bestor examines some ways in which Japanese culture frames disasters, and based on fieldwork in Tohoku in 2011 and 2012, how local meaning-making unfolds.

Dr. Bestor earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University and is Professor of Social Anthropology and Director of the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies  at Harvard University. His books include: Routledge Handbook of Japanese Culture and Society (edited with Victoria Bestor and Akiko Yamagata, 2011), Doing Fieldwork in Japan (2003), and Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (2004).

The Anthropology Graduate Student Association (AGSA) invites you to join the Department of Anthropology for our 13th annual Distinguished Lecture Series featuring cultrual anthropologist Dr. Thedodore Bestor. This event is free, and open to all. 

Date: 
Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 5:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
President's Room Singletary Center

AGSA DISTINGUISHED LECTURE

Sponsor: Anthro Graduate Student Association

Dr. Theodore Bestor, Professor of Social Anthropology, Harvard U.  Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.  

Research Interests: Food systems and culture; the global fishing industry; the impact of the March 11 earthquake, tsunami, and radiation disasters on Japanese society as a whole; urban environments and infrastructures; Japan, East Asia, North Atlantic.  Book:  Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (University of California, 2004).

Date: 
Friday, March 28, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
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