Courses

 

UK COURSES RELATED TO APPALACHIAN STUDIES

SPRING 2018

**Please note: the following list is not all-inclusive. Students may work with the Appalachian Studies Director, Shaunna Scott on individualized curriculum plans to fulfill the Appalachian Studies Minor and Undergraduate Certificate Requirements.**  Please also check meeting times and locations as they are subject to change.

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. (3) Sections: 001. Instructor: Brandon Jent.  Meetings & Times:  Lectures on TR 11:00-12:15 a.m. UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; language gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining. 

HIS 240 History of Kentucky. (3) Instructor: Melanie Beals Goan. Meets: TR 8:00 am - 9:15 a.m., Whitehall Classroom Bldg., Rm. 316.  A general survey of the chief periods of Kentucky's growth and development from 1750 to the present.

APP 300 Topics in Appalachian Studies: Views of Appalachia through Photography, Television, and Story. (3) Instructor: Henry Bundy. Meets: MWF 11:00 am – 12 pm. Location: Roselle Residence Hall, Rm. 0128.  APP 300 examines how memory and "memory work" is used to contest, reaffirm, and construct understandings of Appalachia. Along with readings from several classics of Appalachian history and sociology, this course will introduce students to anthropological theories of memory and will ask them to apply them to, among other things, poetry, television, film and photographs.

ENS 300 002/EES 480-1 ADV Tops Gly (sr) (1-6) Instructor: Alan E Fryar. Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm. Location: Slone Research Building, Rm. 303. This course has an additional fee of $30.00.  Advanced topical course in the geological sciences. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits under different subtitles. Prereq: Consent of instructor.

SW 325 Social Justice Foundations. (3) Instructor: Diane Loeffler. Meets TR 12:30 pm-1:45 pm, Sanders Hall, Rm. 101. Open to students of Social Work or consent of instructor. This course will examine social justice from the broad perspective that all people are deserving of opportunities, rights, protections, obligations, and social benefits. Definitions, theories and perspectives as they relate to context and impact of power, oppression and privilege will be examined within both historical and contemporary lenses. This course will require students to examine personal and professional values and ethics related to social justice as well as how those influence our ability to be change agents for social justice.

NRE 381 Nat Resource And Env Policy Analysis (3) Instructor: John K Schieffer. Meets MWF 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m., Thomas Poe Cooper Bldg, Rm. 113. This course examines the historical development of natural resource and environmental policies, provides an overview of the policy process and key federal agencies which manage natural resources or implement environmental regulations, and introduces basic policy analysis techniques so students can prepare and present a case-specific analysis of existing resource or environmental policy.

APP 399 Practicum, 001 and 002: (1-6) Instructors: Shaunna Scott (001), Christopher Barton (002). Meeting times and locations TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Pass/fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Contact instructors to register for the course.

SOC 444-001 Topics in Political Soc: Public Sociology (3) Instructor: Shaunna Scott. Meets TR 2:00 pm. – 3:15 pm, JSB 103.  This course is designed for undergraduate students interested in a career in public sociology, politics, social movements, community leadership and development, community organizing, and/or community-based or participatory-action research. We will focus on the work of sociologists who use their expertise to serve the public good and work actively in our own projects in service to communities or community organizations in Appalachia or locally (Lexington). 

EES 585 Hydrogeology (3) Instructor: Alan Fryar. Meets MW 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm, 203 Slone Research Building.  This course will address the occurrence, movement, and reactions of water within the Earth’s subsurface. We will emphasize the evaluation of flow directions and rates, calculation of hydraulic properties, and processes controlling the composition of ground water. The course will also introduce the basics of groundwater modeling. 

FALL 2017 

**Please note: the following list is not all-inclusive. Students may work with the Appalachian Studies Director, Shaunna Scott on individualized curriculum plans to fulfill the Appalachian Studies Minor and Undergraduate Certificate requirements.**

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. (3) Instructor:  Shaunna Scott.   Meetings & Times:  Lectures on TR 11:00-11:50 a.m. with various Thursday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining. 

SOC 235 002. Inequalities in Society. (3) Instructor: Kathryn Engle. Meets: MW 9:30 am – 10:45 am. Whitehall Classroom Bldg., Rm. 204. UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course seeks to promote an understanding of inequalities in American society by considering them in the context of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequalities in the United States and other societies. Bases of inequality that may be considered include race/ethnicity, class/status, gender/sexuality, age, political and regional differences as these relate to politics, social justice, community engagement, and/or public policy. 

ANT 330-001 North American Cultures. (3) Instructor: Mary Kiva Anglin. Meetings & Times: TR 9:30-10:45 a.m. Lafferty Hall, Rm. 0201C. Fulfills U.S. Citizen requirement. This course uses readings, films, and music to explore the plurality of peoples and cultures in North America - with particular attention to the US. We will look at youth cultures as sites of creativity and resistance, examine perennial problems in social equality, consider the similarities and differences between urban and rural ways of life, and explore environmental concerns as an integral part of making and sustaining culture.

HIS 351 003 (Topics in U.S. History Since 1789): Environmental History. (3) Instructor: Kathryn Newfont. Meets: TR12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 338. Weevils and white pines as historical actors? Yes! See animals, minerals, and microbes take leading roles in the drama of North American history. We take a case study approach, ranging widely across time and the continent while keeping one foot planted in our own neighboring southern Appalachian region.

ENG 359-001 The Kentucky Literary Heritage. (3) Instructor: Erik Reece. Meets, TR 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. The 90, Rm. 203.  A course exploring the rich literary heritage of the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the greater Appalachian region, surveying its local history and diversity as well as its wider significance for American art. Authors covered may include early figures such as William Wells Brown, the first African-American novelist, and John Fox Jr., the first million-selling novelist; Robert Penn Warren, first Poet Laureate of the United States and author of All the King?s Men; Elizabeth Madox Roberts; Harriette Arnow, winner of the National Book Award in 1954 for The Dollmaker; counter-cultural writers of the 60?s and 70?s such as Hunter S. Thompson, Gurney Norman, and Ed McClanahan; contemporary Kentucky writers such as Wendell Berry, Erik Reece, Bobbie Ann Mason, Sara Jeter Naslund, C. E. Morgan, Kim Edwards, and Gayle Jones; and contemporary award-winning poets such as Frank X Walker, Nikky Finney, and Maurice Manning. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.

CLD 360-401 or SOC 360-401 Environmental Sociology. (3) Instructor: Shaunna Scott.   Meets:  T 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm., Academic Science Building, Rm. 108. UK Core course – fulfills the Citizenship in the USA requirement. (Controlled enrollment for Honors. Please contact the department for more information.) A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice.  

APP 395 Independent Study. (1-6 Variable Credit). Instructor: Shaunna Scott. Meets and Location: TBD. Prereq: APP 200. Credit from this course applies to the following programs: Undergraduate. Independent study of special topic under the supervision of Appalachian Studies-affiliated faculty. Students must identify both a topic for this project as well as a faculty mentor who has agreed to supervise this project. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

APP 399 Practicum, 001 and 002: (1-6) Instructors Christopher Barton, section 001 and Shaunna Scott, section 002.  Meeting times and locations TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Pass/fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course.

FOR 340 Forest Ecology, 001 and 002. (4) Instructor: Mary A Arthur. Lectures Meet: TR 8 am – 9:20 am, Room 113, TPC. Labs Meet: T 1 pm – 4:50 pm (001), R 1 pm – 4:50 pm (002), Rm. 109, TPC.  Prereq: BIO 103 or BIO 150. The study of the forest as a biological community, covering ecosystem concepts such as energy flow, forest nutrition, nutrient cycling, and decomposition. Interrelationships between trees and other organisms comprising the community is also examined through concepts of disturbance, succession, population dynamics, biological and ecosystem diversity, ecosystem management, and ecosystem services.

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management. (4) Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 9:30 am – 10:45 am., Rm. 109-TPC. Principles and techniques involved in watershed management as it relates to the practice of forestry. Emphasis is placed on understanding the hydrologic cycle, plant-soil interactions from a land-use and landscape perspective, and the need for implementation of forestry best management practices.  Prereq: CHE 104 or CHE 105, MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 200, and PLS 366. 

JOU 485-401 Community Journalism. (3) Instructor: Al Cross.  Meets Lecture T 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm., Rm. 52-EGJ, Lab TBD.  A study of all aspects of community news media, including editorial and business operations, and the conflicts that can arise between them, as well as the personal-professional conflicts that community journalists must manage to be successful in the field. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours of independent, advanced reporting and writing, for online and possible print publication. May also include photography and broadcast journalism.  Includes Appalachian option, doing coverage for an Appalachian Kentucky newspaper, if available. Prerequisite:  JOU 301 or JOU 302 or permission of the instructor.

CLD/SOC 517-401 Rural Sociology. (3) Instructor: Rosalind Harris. Meetings and Locations: T 6-8:30 p.m., Don and Cathy Jacobs Science Bldg., Rm. 231. Prereq: Graduate student status; undergraduates with consent of instructor only. A sociological study of the issues relevant to rural communities. Topics may include transformations in rural communities; the agrifood system; and the natural environment in the U.S. and the world.

HP 501-001 Sel Tops Historic Preservation—Rethinking Preservation: Ethics, Public Policy, and Heritage Resources. (3) Emily Bergeron. Meets M 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Bowman Hall, Rm. 100.  This course explores issues of ethics and social justice in the context of historic preservation by examining how these issues have shaped the public debate, policy making, and policy execution surrounding heritage resources. It will provide an overview of how issues such as race, gender, location, and income play a part in preservation efforts in the United States.  It will further address ethical considerations in the global context through an examination of the impacts of climate change, political conflict, and human rights on heritage resources.

HIS 580-001 History of Appalachia. (3) Instructor: Kathryn D. Newfont. Meets: TR 2-3:15 p.m., Barker Hall, Rm. 303. Prereq: HIS 108, 109 or consent of instructor. A survey of the social, economic, and cultural history of Appalachia from the colonial period to the present with emphasis on the interaction of this social state region with the broader forces of social change at work in modern America.

HIS 650-401 Rdgs Spec Tops History, The Mountain South: History, Memory, Myth. (3) Instructor: Kathryn D. Newfont. Meets: W 6:30 pm-9 pm, Patterson Office Tower, Rm. 1745. The past year has seen national attention turn once again toward the mountain South. Among other things, various spokespeople have pointed to Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, by J.D. Vance, as a work potentially helpful to those wishing to understand the recent rise of Donald Trump to the U.S. Presidency. This collective turning toward the Appalachian mountains has become something of an American ritual. It has occurred repeatedly since at least the Civil War, and is visible especially at moments when the Constitution’s “domestic tranquility” goal has seemed distinctly elusive. Why this pattern? Can the region’s history help us to understand it? These are among the questions this course will consider. Alongside history we will discuss memory and myth, and we will attend to the interplay of all three. We explore mountain South history through five centuries, noting some of the many complexities that make this region so fascinating: environments, demographics, politics, cultures, and economies.

SW 580-002 Social Justice. (3) Instructor: Diane Loeffler. Meets TR 12:30 pm-1:45 pm, Whitehall Classroom Bldg., Rm. 336. Open to students of Social Work or consent of instructor. (August 24-December 14) This course will examine social justice from the broad perspective that all people are deserving of opportunities, rights, protections, obligations, and social benefits. Definitions, theories and perspectives as they relate to context and impact of power, oppression and privilege will be examined within both historical and contemporary lenses. This course will require students to examine personal and professional values and ethics related to social justice as well as how those influence our ability to be change agents for social justice.

SPRING 2017

UKC 101 Folk and Traditional Arts. (3) Instructor: Ethan Sharp. Meets: TR 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm. UK Core Course – fulfills the Community, Culture, and Citizenship in the USA requirement. In this course, students will interact with traditional artists in Kentucky, document the production or performance of a traditional art form, and work independently on projects, such as blogs, edited videos and storyboards. The projects will experiment with uses of digital media for the display and interpretation of traditional arts, which include traditional needlework, woodworking, storytelling, music and many other art forms.

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. (3) Sections: 001-006. Instructor:  Shaunna Scott.   Meetings & Times:  Lectures on TR 12:30-1:20 a.m. with various Thursday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining. 

HIS 240 History of Kentucky. (3) Instructor: Melanie Beals Goan. Meets: TR 8:00 am - 9:15 a.m., Whitehall Classroom Bldg., Rm. 316.  A general survey of the chief periods of Kentucky's growth and development from 1750 to the present.

PHI 305-003 Health Care Ethics (3) Instructor: Julia R. Bursten. Meets: MWF 10 – 10:50 a.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 237. In the Old Testament, the Book of Ecclesiastes tells us that everything that happens, happens in its own time: a time to be born, a time to die. A time to kill, a time to heal. A time to keep silence, a time to speak. This advice, handed down from a traditional source of moral authority, suggests a contextual response to ethical questions, such as \Is it ever alright to kill someone for medical reasons?" \Do healthcare providers ever have an obligation to share a patient's secrets with their family members or authorities?" and \Is it ever alright to violate someone's religious beliefs if you believe that in doing so, you are saving their life?" We turn to a wide variety of sources of moral authority to answer these sorts of questions, from the books of the Judeo-Christian Bible, the Tao, and the Qur'an to the laws of a country, the rules of a hospital, and the values of an individual or family. These `moral compasses' that we use greatly influence the ways that we think about people's rights when it comes to health care and biomedical research.

Our aim in this course is to examine the ways that we make decisions about moral and ethical dilemmas in health care, and how these decisions affect health care providers and beneficiaries, as well as their families and the public at large. We will examine cases from a variety of clinical and research settings. By comparing cases of conflict between individual and group rights, provider and patient rights, and intercultural conflicts of values, students will develop basic moral concepts such as what constitutes a right and a moral obligation, analyze the relative importance of values across a variety of cultural and clinical contexts, and formulate a self-reflective picture of their own moral compasses in health care settings.

NRE 381 Nat Resource And Env Policy Analysis (3) Instructor: John K Schieffer. Meets MWF 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m., Thomas Poe Cooper Bldg, Rm. 113. This course examines the historical development of natural resource and environmental policies, provides an overview of the policy process and key federal agencies which manage natural resources or implement environmental regulations, and introduces basic policy analysis techniques so students can prepare and present a case-specific analysis of existing resource or environmental policy.

APP 399 Practicum, 003: (1-6) Instructor: Shane (Jonathan) Barton. Meeting times and locations TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Pass/fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Contact instructor Shane Barton @ shane.barton@uky.edu to register for the course.

 

FOR 435 Conservation Biology. (3) Instructor: John J. Cox. Meets: MW 8:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m., 102 Thomas Poe Cooper Bldg. Review the ethical foundations of conservation biology, discuss the scientific evidence that illustrates recent rapid loss of biological diversity at multiple spatial and temporal scales, identify and elaborate on the causative factors of biodiversity loss, discuss various strategies for conserving biodiversity, and discuss ways that various human cultures and associated resource use influence non-human life and the human societies that depend on them. Conservation biology is multidisciplinary in scope and discussion topics include wildlife management, restoration ecology, economics, ethics, geology, evolution, philosophy, phylogeny, taxonomy, genetics, behavioral ecology, population ecology, disease, sociology, sustainable living, and human dimensions. Conservation topics will be global in scope, with well- studied case examples used to support class activities.

JOU 485 Community Journalism. (3) Instructor: Al Cross.  Meets Lecture T 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm, Rm. 52-EGJ, Lab TBD.  A study of all aspects of community news media, including editorial and business operations, and the conflicts that can arise between them, as well as the personal-professional conflicts that community journalists must manage to be successful in the field. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours of independent, advanced reporting and writing, for online and possible print publication. May also include photography and broadcast journalism.  Includes Appalachian option, doing coverage for an Appalachian Kentucky newspaper, if available. Prerequisite:  JOU 301 or JOU 302 or permission of the instructor.

EES 585 Hydrogeology (3) Instructor: Junfeng Zhu. Meets MW 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm, 203 Slone Research Building.  This course will address the occurrence, movement, and reactions of water within the Earth’s subsurface. We will emphasize the evaluation of flow directions and rates, calculation of hydraulic properties, and processes controlling the composition of ground water. The course will also introduce the basics of groundwater modeling.

SW 580-004 Social Justice Foundations. (3) Instructor: Diane Loeffler. Meets TR 12:30 pm-1:45 pm, Sanders Hall, Rm. 101. Open to students of Social Work or consent of instructor. This course will examine social justice from the broad perspective that all people are deserving of opportunities, rights, protections, obligations, and social benefits. Definitions, theories and perspectives as they relate to context and impact of power, oppression and privilege will be examined within both historical and contemporary lenses. This course will require students to examine personal and professional values and ethics related to social justice as well as how those influence our ability to be change agents for social justice.

SOC 735 Seminar on Inequalities in Appalachia. (3) Instructor: Dwight Billings. Meets T 4 pm - 6:30 pm, Location: 1545 POT. This course is an advanced course in the Sociology Department’s program in Social Inequalities. While it organized by a sociological framework, is also intended to serve as an introduction to multidisciplinary scholarship in Appalachian Studies. We will examine a few “classic” and mostly recent studies to explore interpretive shifts, controversies, and debates in Appalachian Studies especially as they relate to the study of class, race, and gender. Topics will include Appalachia’s discursive formation (its “discovery” in the late nineteenth century) and that of the “hillbilly” as a popular culture icon, the construction of “tradition,” controversies over the politics of culture, interpretations of the region’s social history and development, and other topics such as poverty, globalization, politics and activism, religion, and the environment including mountaintop removal coal mining. We will also examine identities and solidarities including race, class, and gender. A sub-theme will focus on the relationship between Appalachian Studies and other critical cultural studies.

FALL 2016

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. (3) Instructor:  Kathryn Newfont.   Meetings & Times:  Lectures on TR 11:00-11:50 a.m. with various Thursday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining. 

SOC 235 Inequalities in Society. (3) Instructor, Section 001: Kathryn Engle.  001 Meets: MW 3:00 pm – 5 pm (Part of term course meets Oct. 3 – Dec. 14).  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course seeks to promote an understanding of inequalities in American society by considering them in the context of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequalities in the United States and other societies. Bases of inequality that may be considered include race/ethnicity, class/status, gender/sexuality, age, political and regional differences as these relate to politics, social justice, community engagement, and/or public policy. 

LIN 310 American English (3) Instructor: Jennifer Cramer. Meets: MWF 9:00 a.m. – 9:50 a.m., Whitehall Classroom Bldg., Rm. 201. The Appalachian Mountains, which range from New York to Mississippi, making up part of the landscape of 13 different states, are known to many Americans as being home to a unique cultural and linguistic experience. In this course, we will examine the extent to which this uniqueness is true, considering the nature of many myths and stereotypes that exist about this variety. We will discuss certain lexical, phonetic, syntactic, and other linguistic features that set this variety apart from other American varieties while also noting the features the speech of Appalachia shares with others. We will examine the history, origins, and development of English in Appalachia and address issues of identity, education, and standardness with respect to the English of Appalachia.

ID 321 Interiors Studio III (5) Instructor: Rebekah Ison Radtke.  Meetings & Times: Lectures on MW 1 – 4:50 with Studio Sections on F 2 – 3:50. Prereq: ID 222. Continuation of the studio sequence with particular focus on interiors projects at varying levels of complexity. Students will explore design opportunities in missed use projects. Collaboration and teamwork emphasized. Sustainable design issues will be explored.

HIS 351 (Topics in U.S. History Since 1789): American Environmental History. (3) Instructor: Kathryn Newfont. Meets: TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 208. Weevils and white pines as historical actors? Yes! See animals, minerals, and microbes take leading roles in the drama of North American history. We take a case study approach, ranging widely across time and the continent while keeping one foot planted in our own neighboring southern Appalachian region.

CLD 360-001 or SOC 360-001 Environmental Sociology. (3) Instructor: Shaunna Scott.   Meets:  T 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm., Academic Science Building, Rm. 103.  UK Core course – fulfills the Citizenship in the USA requirement.  A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice.

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management. (4) Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 9:30 am – 10:45 am., Rm. 113-TPC, Lab Meets TBD, Location TBD. Principles and techniques involved in watershed management as it relates to the practice of forestry. Emphasis is placed on understanding the hydrologic cycle, plant-soil interactions from a land-use and landscape perspective, and the need for implementation of forestry best management practices.  Prereq: CHE 104 or CHE 105, MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 200, and PLS 366. 

JOU 485 Community Journalism. (3) Instructor: Al Cross.  Meets Lecture T 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm., Rm. 52-EGJ, Lab TBD.  A study of all aspects of community news media, including editorial and business operations, and the conflicts that can arise between them, as well as the personal-professional conflicts that community journalists must manage to be successful in the field. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours of independent, advanced reporting and writing, for online and possible print publication. May also include photography and broadcast journalism.  Includes Appalachian option, doing coverage for an Appalachian Kentucky newspaper, if available. Prerequisite:  JOU 301 or JOU 302 or permission of the instructor.

SW 580-004 Social Justice Foundations. (3) Instructor: Diane Loeffler. Meets TR 12:30 pm-1:45 pm, Sanders Hall, Rm. 101. Open to students of Social Work or consent of instructor. This course will examine social justice from the broad perspective that all people are deserving of opportunities, rights, protections, obligations, and social benefits. Definitions, theories and perspectives as they relate to context and impact of power, oppression and privilege will be examined within both historical and contemporary lenses. This course will require students to examine personal and professional values and ethics related to social justice as well as how those influence our ability to be change agents for social justice.

SPRING 2016

APP 200, 001-006 Introduction to Appalachian Studies.  Instructor:  Dwight Billings, TAs: Kathryn Engle, Sarah Watson.  Meets:  Lectures on MW 12:00-12:50 p.m. with various Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog). This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.

APP 399-001 Practicum.  Instructor: Shaunna Scott.  Meeting dates: TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Enroll in this one-credit course under Shaunna Scott.

APP 399-002 Practicum.  Instructor: TBD.  Meeting dates: TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Enroll in this one-credit course under Multiple Instructors.

APP 399-003 Practicum: Digital Humanities as a Tool for Appalachian Tourism Development.  Instructor: Jonathan (Shane) Barton.  Meeting dates: TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Enroll in this one-credit course under Jonathan Shane Barton.

HIS 580-001 History of Appalachia. Instructor: Kathryn Newfont. Meets MW, 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Rm. 306. A survey of the social, economic, and cultural history of Appalachia from the colonial period to the present with emphasis on the interaction of this social state region with the broader forces of social change at work in modern America.  Prereq: HIS 108, 109 or consent of instructor.

SOC 444 Public Sociology. Instructor: Shaunna Scott. Meets: TR, 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Room 243, Whitehall Classroom Building. Former American Sociological Association President Michael Burawoy defines public sociology as an effort to bring sociology into dialogue with audiences beyond the academy with the goal of achieving an open dialogue in which both sides deepen their understanding of public issues. In this course, we will both explore various perspectives on the practice of public sociology and practice public sociology ourselves through community engagement and research that puts our class in dialogue with an eastern Kentucky community as it seeks to navigate its post-coal economic transition. Students who wish to gain additional experience in the “field” are advised to take this course in conjunction with APP 399: Practicum in Appalachian Studies. Please contact Dr. Shaunna Scott at shaunna.scott@uky.edu for more information.

SOC/ANT/CLD 534 Sociology of Appalachia. Instructor: Shaunna Scott.  Meets: R, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., Room 210, Kastle Hall. This class will partner with residents of Elkhorn City, Kentucky, to support the community’s economic development plans to transition to a post-coal economy based upon outdoor recreation & adventure tourism. Students will learn about the tradition of participatory action research in Appalachian Studies and will acquire and apply participatory action research skills to address real-world problems in a Kentucky region. Such skills include: research & research ethics; visual, oral & written communication; meeting facilitation; community organizing; publicity & media relations; fund-raising; and grant-writing. Prereq: Sociology, Anthropology or CLD senior major or minor; Appalachian Studies minor; graduate student status; or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT/CLD 534.)

GEO 509 Workshop in Geospatial Technologies. Instructor: Matthew Wilson. Meets: TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 313. This course focuses on the development of applied GIS skills and follows with a participatory workshop model with intensive, hands-on collaboration with community partners. The course covers a full range of collaborative GIS: working with team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analyses, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses.

FALL 2015

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. (3) Instructor:  Kathryn Newfont.   Meetings & Times:  Lectures on MW 10:00-10:50 a.m. with various Wednesday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining. 

MUS 301 Appalachian Music. (3) Instructor: Ronald A Pen.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm., 017 FA, Fine Arts Building.  Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between black and white contributions. 

LIN 317-001 Appalachian English. (3) Instructor: Jennifer Cramer. Meets: TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Chemistry-Physics Bldg., Rm. 201. The Appalachian Mountains, which range from New York to Mississippi, making up part of the landscape of 13 different states, are known to many Americans as being home to a unique cultural and linguistic experience. In this course, we will examine the extent to which this uniqueness is true, considering the nature of many myths and stereotypes that exist about this variety. We will discuss certain lexical, phonetic, syntactic, and other linguistic features that set this variety apart from other American varieties while also noting the features the speech of Appalachia shares with others. We will examine the history, origins, and development of English in Appalachia and address issues of identity, education, and standardness with respect to the English of Appalachia.

CLD 102 The Dynamics of Rural Social Life. (3) Instructor:  Darryl Anthony Strode.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  This course applies to the UK Core requirement(s): Inquiry - Social Sciences.  Introduces major concepts of sociology by exploring social, political and cultural issues confronting rural society and American agriculture, such as: population change, industrialization, energy developments, agricultural change. Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 101.  

PLS 103 Plants, Soils, and People: A Global Perspective (001, 002). (3) Instructor: David W. Williams. TAs TBD. Lecture meets: MW 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m., Ag. Science Building North, Rm. A0007-AGN, Rec. 001 F 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m., Rec. 002 F 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m., Rec. 003 F 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m. (Please check course catalog for discussion section locations.) Only a few things are essential to life, and food is one of them. What people eat is about what they need to be healthy, what they want to eat (personal preference and culture), and what they have available or can afford to eat. Agriculture plays a vital role in human food security. Many experts feel the world is facing a food supply crisis. Knowledge and application of the principles of plant and soil sciences will have a dramatic effect on human food security, now and into the future, both locally and globally. However, these issues will also be impacted by future human population growth, urbanization, consumer preferences, human decisions regarding civic duties, and climate change. Students successfully completing this course will leave with an understanding of the need to sustainably expand the world’s food supply, the basic principles of plant and soil science and their application to this problem, and their own potential role in determining our ability to meet this challenge. Students may not receive credit for both this course and PLS 104.

FOR 200 Basics of Geospatial Technology. (2) Instructor: James M. Ringe. Meets: M 1:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m., Rm. 109-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building. A basic introduction to the various types of maps and their uses, field navigation skills, and map making. The course is heavily field and laboratory based, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and practice. Both traditional technologies, such as compasses, U.S. Geological Survey maps, and aerial photographs as well as newer technologies, such as global positioning systems and geographic information system databases will be employed in carrying out course exercises.

HIS 351 (Topics in U.S. History Since 1789): American Environmental History. (3) Instructor: Kathryn Newfont. Meets: MW 3:00 p.m. – 4:45 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 346. Weevils and white pines as historical actors? Yes! See animals, minerals, and microbes take leading roles in the drama of North American history. We take a case study approach, ranging widely across time and the continent while keeping one foot planted in our own neighboring southern Appalachian region. 

SOC 235 Inequalities in Society. (3) Instructor: TBD.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  (Part of term course meets Oct. 6 – Dec. 17, lecture, TBD). UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course seeks to promote an understanding of inequalities in American society by considering them in the context of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequalities in the United States and other societies. Bases of inequality that may be considered include race/ethnicity, class/status, gender/sexuality, age, political and regional differences as these relate to politics, social justice, community engagement, and/or public policy. (Same as AAS 235.) 

GWS 250 Social Movements. (3) Instructor: TBD. Meets: TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., F. Paul Anderson Tower, Rm. 257. This course examines women’s social movements across at least three different cultural/ national world areas, including key theories that explain the origins, strategies, and success of women’s social movements. In this course, we critically analyze case studies from different parts of the world to understand how social movements work on the ground and in specific cultural environments with unique historical trajectories, attending to ways in which social movements are shaped by, and do or do not result in changes to, structures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. 

FOR 260 Forest Products and Wood Science. (4) Instructor: James M. Ringe.  Lecture meets: TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Rm. 109-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building. Lab meets: W 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Rm. 109-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building. An examination of basic material properties of wood, methods by which it is used, and issues and economic conditions in which domestic and global wood markets operate. Concepts covered include species identification, chemical and mechanical properties and their effect on utilization, utilization technologies and their linkage to silvicultural practices, and affiliated issues such as recycling, product certification, environmental concerns, and alternative products.

CLD 360-001 or SOC 360-001 Environmental Sociology. (3) Instructor: John D. Johnson.   Meets:  T 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm., Whitehall Classroom Building, Rm. 47.  UK Core course – fulfills the Citizenship in the USA requirement.  A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice.  

EES 385-001  Hydrology and Water Resources. (3) Instructor:  Alan E. Fryar.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  The occurrence, movement, and quality of fresh water in the water cycle, including environmental problems and possible solutions. Case studies are explored through readings, videos, and required field trips. Prereq: GLY 220.

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management. (4) Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm., Rm. 212-TPC, Lab Meets T 2:00 pm – 4:50 pm., Location TBD. Principles and techniques involved in watershed management as it relates to the practice of forestry. Emphasis is placed on understanding the hydrologic cycle, plant-soil interactions from a land-use and landscape perspective, and the need for implementation of forestry best management practices.  Prereq: CHE 104 or CHE 105, MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 200, and PLS 366.  

JOU 485 Community Journalism. (3) Instructor: Al Cross.  Meets Lecture W 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm., Rm. 52-EGJ, Lab TBD.  A study of all aspects of community news media, including editorial and business operations, and the conflicts that can arise between them, as well as the personal-professional conflicts that community journalists must manage to be successful in the field. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours of independent, advanced reporting and writing, for online and possible print publication. May also include photography and broadcast journalism.  Includes Appalachian option, doing coverage for an Appalachian Kentucky newspaper, if available. Prerequisite:  JOU 301 or JOU 302 or permission of the instructor.

CPH 601-001  Environmental Health. (3) Instructor:  Nancy E Johnson.  Meets: W 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CPH 601-201  Environmental Health. (3) Instructor:  David M Mannino. Meeting days, time, and location is via internet.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CLD 675 Theor. Found Communications & Community. (3) Instructor: Kang Namkoong. Meeting days, time, and location via internet. This course is designed to explore the dynamics of community development and leadership communication within both geographic-bounded communities and communities of taste. (Same as SOC 675.) Part of Distance Learning Programs.

SPRING 2015

A&S 100-012 Intro Course: Energy and Society. Instructor: Shannon Elizabeth Bell. Meets: M, 4 p.m. – 5:40 p.m., Woodland Glen II, Room 003. (1 Credit hour) This course permits the offering at the introductory level of special courses of an interdisciplinary, topical, or experimental nature. Each proposal must be approved by the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. A particular title may be offered at most three times under the A&S 100 number. Students may not repeat under the same title. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. A&S 100-012 is for Greenhouse students only. This section is restricted to students with freshman or sophomore status. First year students who do not have freshman or sophomore status should contact Jessica Pennington for enrollment information, jessica.pennington@uky.edu

APP 200, 001-006 Introduction to Appalachian Studies.  Instructor:  Dwight Billings, TAs: Kathryn Engle, Jasper Waugh-Quasebarth. Meets: Lectures on MW 12:00-12:50 p.m. with various Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog). This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.

APP 399-001 Practicum.  Instructor: Shaunna ScottMeeting dates: TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Enroll in this one-credit course under Shaunna Scott.

APP 399-002 Practicum.  Instructor: Ann KingsolverMeeting dates: TBD.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Enroll in this one-credit course under Ann Kingsolver.

APP 399-003 Practicum: Digital Humanities as a Tool for Appalachian Tourism Development.  Instructor: Jonathan (Shane) Barton.  Meeting dates: March 16-21, 2015.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. In this Spring Break Practicum, students will explore the use of digital humanities as a tool for tourism development in Appalachia Kentucky. Students will learn about and use archival resources at UK and participate in oral history interviewing. This practicum is a partnership with residents of Corbin, KY in developing their new railroad museum. Students will be meeting on Campus some days and making some day trips to Corbin; transportation provided. There is no course fee. Enroll in this one-credit course under Jonathan Shane Barton.

ENG 425-001 Environmental Writing.  Instructor: Erik A. Reece.  Meets: MW, 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m., Thomas Poe Cooper Bldg., Rm. 101.   Students will consider the way writers address environmental issues by exploring various forms of environmental writing, from personal narrative to literary nonfiction to advocacy. Students will be required to take a mandatory day long field trip to UK's Robinson Forest. All students must participate in this field trip.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.

GWS 300-002 Gender, Film & Appalachia. (Taught with IAS 401-001.) Instructor: Carol Mason.  Meets: TR, 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 246.  This course examines how gender is constructed through film and how filmic representation shapes our ideas of place, namely Appalachia. Students will study documentary, Hollywood, and made-for-TV movies with the help of expert film scholars and special guest speakers who will elucidate how femininities, masculinities, and movements emerge in cinematic form.

HIS 351-007 Kentucky Coal. Instructor: Renfrew Christie. Meets: MWF, 9:00 a.m. to 9:50 a.m., Barker Hall, Room 301. A comparative history of coal and energy production in Kentucky and other parts of the world. Taught by a South African activist who engaged in espionage activities against South Africa’s nuclear programs during the country’s attempts to enrich uranium for military purposes during the 1960s and 70s.

LIN 310-001 American English. Instructor: Jennifer Cramer. Meets: MWF, 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 336This course provides a thorough examination of the varieties of modern American English: regional, social, and ethnic varieties, gender differences in communication, creoles and pidgins, stylistic variation. Students will be exposed to the history and methods of the study of American dialects through course lectures and through first-hand experiences with linguistic data. Same as LIN 310. No prerequisites. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Study of topics relevant to Appalachian Studies, such as gender, folklore, literature, religion, community development, public policy, social movements and social change. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve credits under different subtitles.

ANT 580 Adv Topics in Anthropology: Global Appalachia. Instructor: Ann Kingsolver. Meets: M 5 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., Room 108, Lafferty Hall. In this course, we will examine the ways in which Appalachia has always had strong global connections, environmentally, economically, and culturally.  Instead of seeing mountain regions as isolated, we will focus on the shared histories and concerns of communities in Appalachia and other mountain regions, including social and economic marginalization, resource extraction, low-wage industries, migration, and environmental challenges. This course will also emphasize what can be learned from global mountain regions about sustainable livelihoods, community identity and action, and social capital at a time when the nation-states that have marginalized mountain communities now face some of the same challenges. There will be different requirements for graduate and undergraduate students in the course. Students will have the opportunity to engage directly with young people in the Appalachian region and in mountain regions in other nations.

SOC/ANT/CLD 534 Sociology of Appalachia. Instructor: Shaunna Scott.  Meets: R, 4 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Room 1545, Patterson Office Tower. This class will partner with residents of Elkhorn City, Kentucky, to support the community’s economic development plans to transition to a post-coal economy based upon outdoor recreation & adventure tourism. Students will learn about the tradition of participatory action research in Appalachian Studies and will acquire and apply participatory action research skills to address real-world problems in a Kentucky region. Such skills include: research & research ethics; visual, oral & written communication; meeting facilitation; community organizing; publicity & media relations; fund-raising; and grant-writing. Prereq: Sociology, Anthropology or CLD senior major or minor; Appalachian Studies minor; graduate student status; or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT/CLD 534.)

CPH 644-401 Rural Health Disparities.  Instructor: Robin Cline Vanderpool.  Meets: R 6 p.m.-8:30 p.m., 207 Research Facility. Through class meetings, course readings, and assignments, this course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of issues pertaining to health disparities of rural populations by examining current programs and policies, relevant literature, public health practices, and quantitative research pertaining to the health and well-being of rural populations.

GEO 509 Workshop in Geospatial Technologies. Instructor: Matthew Wilson. Meets: TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Room 313. This course focuses on the development of applied GIS skills and follows with a participatory workshop model with intensive, hands-on collaboration with community partners. The course covers a full range of collaborative GIS: working with team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analyses, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses.

SOC 735 – 001 Graduate Seminar in Social Inequalities: Appalachia.  Instructor: Dwight Billings.  Meets: T 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m., Room 110, Patterson Office Tower. Advanced study of topics of current importance in the study of social inequalities and stratification. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: SOC 635 or consent of instructor. This course is an elective in the Sociology Department’s program in social inequalities and can be counted toward the Graduate Certificate in Social Theory. It is also intended to serve as a graduate level introduction to multidisciplinary scholarship in Appalachian Studies. The course will be organized by examining themes derived from the critical social theory of Jurgen Habermas in order to interrogate recent work in Appalachian Studies. I believe that we will see both that Habermas raises important questions in regard to Appalachia and that research on the region also helps to identify shortcomings in his critical sociology (especially in relation to other critical approaches such as Marx and postmodern Marxists, feminist theory, Freire, and Gramsci). Issues include communicative reason and instrumental rationality; language, literacy, and power; domination and the intersectionality of class, race, and gender; ethics and human rights; law and participatory democracy; the colonization of social lifeworlds by social systems; “new social movements” and the environment; and civil society, the public sphere and the “commons.” While the course themes will be organized in relation to issues raised by these critical theories, most of the readings will be drawn from the multidisciplinary Appalachian Studies literature including contributions from Anthropology, English, Economics, Education, History, Gender and Women Studies, Geography, Political Science and Sociology.

FALL 2014

CLD 102  The Dynamics of Rural Social Life.  Instructor:  Darryl Anthony Strode.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  This course applies to the UK Core requirement(s): Inquiry - Social Sciences.  Introduces major concepts of sociology by exploring social, political and cultural issues confronting rural society and American agriculture, such as: population change, industrialization, energy developments, agricultural change. Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 101. 

PLS 103 Plants, Soils, and People: A Global Perspective (001, 002). (3) Instructor: David W. Williams. TAs TBD. Lecture meets: MW 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m., Rec. 001 F 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m., Rec. 002 F 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m., Ag. Science Building North, Rm. A0006-AGN. Only a few things are essential to life, and food is one of them. What people eat is about what they need to be healthy, what they want to eat (personal preference and culture), and what they have available or can afford to eat. Agriculture plays a vital role in human food security. Many experts feel the world is facing a food supply crisis. Knowledge and application of the principles of plant and soil sciences will have a dramatic effect on human food security, now and into the future, both locally and globally. However, these issues will also be impacted by future human population growth, urbanization, consumer preferences, human decisions regarding civic duties, and climate change. Students successfully completing this course will leave with an understanding of the need to sustainably expand the world’s food supply, the basic principles of plant and soil science and their application to this problem, and their own potential role in determining our abilityto meet this challenge.

FOR 110 Natural Resource Issues. (1) Instructor: David B. Wagner Meets: TR 3:30 p.m. – 4:20 p.m. Rom. 113-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building.  A communication intensive course in which students will learn to research current forestry and natural resource issues, interpret popular press and professional publications, evaluate opposing viewpoints, and discuss issues in a clear, effective and professional manner through a variety of communication media.

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor:  Ann Kingsolver.   Meetings & Times:  Lectures on MW 10:00-10:50 a.m. with various Wednesday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

FOR 200 Basics of Geospatial Technology. (2) Instructor: James M. Ringe. Meets: M 1:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m., Rm. 109-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building. A basic introduction to the various types of maps and their uses, field navigation skills, and map making. The course is heavily field and laboratory based, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and practice. Both traditional technologies, such as compasses, U.S. Geological Survey maps, and aerial photographs as well as newer technologies, such as global positioning systems and geographic information system databases will be employed in carrying out course exercises.

SOC 235-001 Inequalities in Society.  Instructor: Lisa M. Conley.  Meets: TR 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course seeks to promote an understanding of inequalities in American society by considering them in the context of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequalities in the United States and other societies. Bases of inequality that may be considered include race/ethnicity, class/status, gender/sexuality, age, political and regional differences as these relate to politics, social justice, community engagement, and/or public policy. (Same as AAS 235.)

GWS 250 Social Movements. (3) Instructor: William J. Korinko. Meets: TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., B0057-DH, Dickey Hall. This course examines women’s social movements across at least three different cultural/ national world areas, including key theories that explain the origins, strategies, and success of women’s social movements. In this course, we critically analyze case studies from different parts of the world to understand how social movements work on the ground and in specific cultural environments with unique historical trajectories, attending to ways in which social movements are shaped by, and do or do not result in changes to, structures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality.

CLD 260  Community Portraits.  Instructor:  Richard C Maurer.  Meets:  MWF 9:00 am – 9:50 am.  This course introduces the social science concept of community. The focus will be on definitions of community, and the different types of communities that exist in society. Students will gather and analyze information in real communities that represent different types of community.

FOR 260 Forest Products and Wood Science. (4) Instructor: James M. Ringe.  Lecture meets: TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m., Rm. 109-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building. Lab meets: W 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Rm. 109-TPC, Thomas Poe Cooper Building. An examination of basic material properties of wood, methods by which it is used, and issues and economic conditions in which domestic and global wood markets operate. Concepts covered include species identification, chemical and mechanical properties and their effect on utilization, utilization technologies and their linkage to silvicultural practices, and affiliated issues such as recycling, product certification, environmental concerns, and alternative products.

MUS 301 Appalachian Music. Instructor: Ronald A Pen.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm., 017 FA, Fine Arts Building.  Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between black and white contributions.

GEO 321-001 Land/People/Development in Appalachia.  Instructor: Sarah Ashley Watson.  Meets: MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m., Whitehall Classroom Building, Rm. 216 CB.  Major themes revolve around regional diversity and regional development. Major topics examined include physical environmental context, historical development, and economic and population geography. The study region includes the upland areas between southern New York State and central Alabama.  Prerequisites: GEO 130, 152, or 172, or consent of instructor.

AEC 324-401   Agricultural Law.  Instructor: Clinton R Quarles. Meets: T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm., Rm. N12-AGN.  A study of legislation, administrative regulations, constitutions and court cases that have economic ramifications on agricultural and rural life.  Prereq: "C" or better in ECO 201.

SOC 340  Community Interaction.  Instructor:  Lorraine E Garkovich.  Meets:  MW 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Rm. 0052B-GARR, Garrigus Bldg.  Examines community effects on group and individual behavior from the perspective of sociological social psychology. By focusing on individuals, individuals in groups, and groups, special emphasis is given to how community context shapes the attitudes, beliefs, and actions of individuals as well as their interactions with others. Prereq: CLD 102 or SOC 101 or consent of instructor. Primary registration access limited to SOC and CLD majors and remaining seats open during secondary registration. 

CLD 360-001 or SOC 360-001  Environmental Sociology.  Instructor: John D. Johnson.   Meets:  TR 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Citizenship in the USA requirement.  A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice. 

EES 385-001  Hydrology and Water Resources.  Instructor:  Alan E. Fryar.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  The occurrence, movement, and quality of fresh water in the water cycle, including environmental problems and possible solutions. Case studies are explored through readings, videos, and required field trips. Prereq: GLY 220

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management.  Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm., Rm. 212-TPC,  Lab Meets T 2:00 pm – 4:50 pm., Location TBD. Principles and techniques involved in watershed management as it relates to the practice of forestry. Emphasis is placed on understanding the hydrologic cycle, plant-soil interactions from a land-use and landscape perspective, and the need for implementation of forestry best management practices.  Prereq: CHE 104 or CHE 105, MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 200, and PLS 366. 

SPA 480 Hispanic Kentucky, Instructor: Ruth Roark Brown. MWF 12:00 p.m. – 12:50 p.m., Rm. 301-BH, Barker Hall.  The study of U.S. Latino history, with primary emphasis on the evolution of politics of immigration and Spanish in the U.S. These issues will be studied with the primary intent of what they mean to Central Kentucky. This course is conducted in Spanish and incorporates a service learning component which is finalized the first week of the semester.  Additional Course Note: As a student of Spanish who looks forward to becoming a bilingual professional, it is inevitable that you will have direct contact with members of the growing Latino population not only in your daily life but in your future career. This course studies U.S. Latino history and culture with an emphasis on the political and socio-economic impact of immigration by Spanish-speakers in Kentucky. In addition to our study of artistic expression and academic research produced by and about Latinos in our region, this course includes a community-based service learning component through which you will engage with the history and current life of the local Latino community first hand. While many of our readings are in English, this course will be conducted entirely in Spanish. [Projects can be Appalachia-focused.]

JOU 485 Community Journalism.  Instructor: Al Cross.  Meets Lecture W 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm., Rm. 52-EGJ, Lab TBD.  A study of all aspects of community news media, including editorial and business operations, and the conflicts that can arise between them, as well as the personal-professional conflicts that community journalists must manage to be successful in the field. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours of independent, advanced reporting and writing, for online and possible print publication. May also include photography and broadcast journalism.  Includes Appalachian option, doing coverage for an Appalachian Kentucky newspaper, if available. Prerequisite:  JOU 301 or JOU 302 or permission of the instructor.

JOU 499-401 Covering the Senate Race. Instructors: Al Cross and Bill Goodman. T 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm., Rm. 52-EGJ. Students will covering the 2011 general election for U.S. senator between Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell and Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, the presumptive Democratic nominee. Students will be required to travel to campaign events and file some stories for publication on deadline, and work intensively in the four weeks preceding the Nov. 6 election, concluding with live coverage on election night (the instructors will be on KET’s election-night coverage) and possible follow-ups the next day and the rest of November. Individual stories may be text, broadcast or photo, as determined by the instructors.  A website or blog will be created for publication of student work. Prerequisite: JOU 301 or JOU 302 or permission of the instructor. [Projects can be Appalachia-focused,]

A-E 550 Community Art Education. (3) Instructor: Martha Kay Hahn Henton. Meets: MW 4:45 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Rm. 218, LCLI, Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library. An examination of community arts organizations and the role they play in identifying and interpreting the diverse artistic make-up of the community. The course will provide students with the tools to define, locate, and research community organizations as potential sites for art programming.

CPH 601-001  Environmental Health.   Instructor:  Nancy E Johnson.  Meets: W 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CPH 601-201  Environmental Health.  Instructor:  David M Mannino. Meeting days, time, and location TBD.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CLD 675 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATIONS. (3) Meeting days, time, and location TBD. This course is designed to explore the dynamics of community development and leadership communication within both geographic-bounded communities and communities of taste. (Same as SOC 675.)

BSC 731 Methods and Technologies in Clinical and Translational Science. (3) Instructor: Joshua Lile; Hannah K. Knudsen. Meets: R 5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Location: Charles T. Wethington Jr. Bldg, Rm. 0220. This overview course is designed to introduce the student to the major methods and technologies of clinical and translational science. The course will consist of 14 presentations followed by open discussion of the presentation and assigned readings by class members. The location of classes may change based on the content of the lecture. Homework assignments will provide experiential opportunities to work with the various methods and technologies. Active participation by all members is expected. Each weekly presentation is designed to provide a general overview of a method or technology commonly used in clinical and translational science. Discussions are intended to integrate the information across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Homework assignments are designed to provide practical experience with the discussion topic. Prereq: Graduate standing. (Same as CPH 669.)

SPRING 2014

APP 200  Introduction to Appalachian Studies.  Instructor:  Dwight Billings, TAs: Jenrose Fitzgerald, Leah Vance.  Meets:  Lectures on MW 12:00-12:50 p.m. with various Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.

APP 300/SOC/CLD 360-001 Special Topics in Appalachian Studies: Environmental Sociology.  Instructor: Shaunna Scott.  Meets: TR 2:00 p.m.-3:15 p.m., 340 Whitehall Classroom Building.  In this course, we will examine the inter-relationship between society and natural environment, with a particular emphasis on examining pragmatic solutions to environmental issues, including climate change, waste, biodiversity, water, population, food, transportation, energy production, environmental justice and sustainability.

As part of this course, we will partner with residents of Elkhorn City, Kentucky, and students from Eastern Kentucky University, in support of the community’s efforts to create a more sustainable and just post-coal economic future.

Students who enroll in this course are highly encouraged also to enroll in SOC/CLD/APP 399 for additional course credit. Students in the practicum will participate in field work in Elkhorn City during Spring Break as part of the “Alternate Spring Break Program.” The specific tasks during the field experience are to be determined.

APP 399-001 Practicum.  Instructor: Shaunna Scott.  Meeting dates: 3/11/14-3/16/14.  A field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience supervised by an Appalachian Studies Program faculty affiliate. Pass-fail only. A learning contract must be filed in order to receive credit for this course. Enroll in this one-credit course under Shaunna Scott. The class will take place in Elkhorn City during Spring Break 2014 (Mar 11-16). Students will learn about the history and economy of the area and will engage in activities in support of Elkhorn City’s economic development plans to lay the groundwork for a more sustainable and just post-coal economic future. The specific tasks are not yet determined. Transportation, lodging and meals will be available to the group at a cost of no more than $200 for the week.

Students who enroll in this course are highly encouraged also to enroll in SOC/CLD 360 / APP 300: Environmental Sociology under Shaunna Scott. Study of topics relevant to Appalachian Studies, such as gender, folklore, literature, religion, community development, public policy, social movements and social change. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve credits under different subtitles.

LIN 311-001 Language in U.S. Society.  Instructor: Jennifer S. Cramer.  Meets: on MWF 12:00 p.m.-12:50 p.m., 114 Whitehall Classroom Building.  This course in an introduction to the linguistic diversity of the United States and the role of language in the production and negotiation of various forms of social difference (e.g; ethnicity, gender, region, etc.). Topics include, the role of language is the formation of social identity categories, social issues related to non-standard English dialects, and multilingualism in American society. Emphasis will be given to questions of power and resistance related to language use in the contexts of government, education and business.

Undergraduate/Graduate

A&S 500-001  NGOs and the Politics of Humanitarian Aid.  Instructor:  Sasikumar Balasundaram.  Meets:  TR 2:00 – 3:15 pm, 333 White Hall Classroom Building.  This course will use a critical approach to examine the political nature of humanitarian aid. This course will provide students with a foundation for understanding humanitarian crises, how the international aid communities function, and the role of NGOs in humanitarian crises. Using cross-cultural examples, students will compare and contrast the roles, power, and politics of states and NGOs in humanitarian interventions. This course will offer an opportunity for students to understand development discourses and international aid.  In addition, we will also examine the challenges faced, and damages caused, by humanitarian regimes in the Global South and how aid-receiving communities respond to them. Requirements for undergraduates and graduate students will be different.  This course meets the A&S social science requirement, and requirements for the International Studies major and the new Global Studies certificate.

A&S 500-002  Global Appalachia.  Instructor: Ann Kingsolver.  Meets:  TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm, 303 White Hall Classroom Building.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which Appalachia has always had strong global connections, environmentally, economically, and culturally.  Instead of seeing mountain regions as isolated, we will focus on the shared histories and concerns of communities in Appalachia and other mountain regions, including social and economic marginalization, resource extraction, low-wage industries, migration, and environmental challenges. This course will also emphasize what can be learned from global mountain regions about sustainable livelihoods, community identity and action, and social capital at a time when the nation-states that have marginalized mountain communities now face some of the same challenges. There will be different requirements for graduate and undergraduate students in the course.  This semester, the course will focus on water issues in Global Mountain Regions, and students will have the opportunity to communicate directly with students in Global Mountain Regions around the world.  

CPH 644-401 Rural Health Disparities.  Instructor: Robin Cline Vanderpool.  Meets: R 6 p.m.-8:30 p.m., 202 Research Facility.  Through class meetings, course readings, and assignments, this course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of issues pertaining to health disparities of rural populations by examining current programs and policies, relevant literature, public health practices, and quantitative research pertaining to the health and well-being of rural populations.

SOC 735-001 Theories and Methods of Class Analysis.  Instructor: Dwight Billings.  Meets: T 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m., 101 Miller Hall.  The 2008 Depression brought on by the financial sector, and the insurgency of Occupy Wall Street, have put American and global inequality on the map once again. It would seem like a good time to reconsider Marxian class analysis—except for the dogmatism, determinism, and reductionism of classical Marxism. In this course we will consider an alternative “postmodern”/ “poststructuralist” approach to Marxist  class analysis that promises to avoid those old traps with a fresh analysis of global inequalities.  Readings will include works by critical economists, sociologists, and feminist geographers inspired by Stephen Resnick and Richard Wolff’s path-breaking book, Knowledge and Class: A Marxian Critique of Political Economy, including studies by J. K. Gibson-Graham (The End of Capitalism (as we have known it) and A Postcapitalist Politics), David Ruccio (Development and Globalization), and others. The course will conclude with practical applications of the approach including Richard Wolff’s Democracy at Work and Gibson-Graham, Cameron, and Healey’s Take Back the Economy

 

SUMMER 2013 

APP 200  Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor: Catherine Herdman. Meets: On-line, Second six weeks summer session. UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.  This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

FALL 2013

CLD 102  The Dynamics of Rural Social Life.  Instructor:  Darryl Anthony Strode.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  This course applies to the UK Core requirement(s): Inquiry - Social Sciences.  Introduces major concepts of sociology by exploring social, political and cultural issues confronting rural society and American agriculture, such as: population change, industrialization, energy developments, agricultural change. Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 101.

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor:  Ann Kingsolver.   Meetings & Times:  Lectures on MW 10:00-10:50 a.m. with various Wednesday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

GWS 201-003-005  Intro GWS Arts/Humanities.  Instructor:  Carol Ann Mason.  Meets MW 1:00 pm – 1:50 pm and various other times (see Course Catalog). This course applies to the UK Core requirement(s): Inquiry – Humanities.  Introduces students to basic methods of humanistic inquiry in Gender and Women's Studies examines cultural beliefs and meanings about men and women and explores the lives achievements and creative expressions of women in a cross-cultural interactive and interdisciplinary format.

SOC 235-001 Inequalities in Society.  Instructor: Shaunna L Scott.  Meets: TR 2:00 pm – 3:15 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. Analysis of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequality in various societies. One of the five modules for this course focuses on Appalachia. Prereq: SOC 101 or CLD 102.

GWS 250-001 Social Movements.  Instructor: Karen Tice.  Meets: TR 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm.   This course examines women's social movements across at least three different cultural/national world areas, including key theories that explain the origins, strategies, and success of women's social movements. In this course, we critically analyze case studies from different parts of the world to understand how social movements work on the ground and in specific cultural environments with unique historical trajectories, attending to ways in which social movements are shaped by, and do or do not result in changes to, structures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality.

CLD 260  Community Portraits.  Instructor:  Richard C Maurer.  Meets:  MWF 9:00 am – 9:50 am.  This course introduces the social science concept of community. The focus will be on definitions of community, and the different types of communities that exist in society. Students will gather and analyze information in real communities that represent different types of community.

A&S 300-004 International Perspectives on Refugees and Humanitarianism.  Instructor: Sasikumar Balasundaram.  Meets: TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  The instructor brings direct, global experience to instruction about international refugees and humanitarian aid through various media. This course meets the A&S social science elective requirement; the International Studies distribution requirements in Human Rights & Social Movements, International Relations, International Development, and East, South, and Southeast Asia; and counts toward the Global Studies certificate.

AEC 300-003  Tops AEC:  Ag & Rural Spatial Economics.  Instructor: Alison F. Davis.  Meets: TR 8:00 am – 9:15 am.  Study in special topics in agricultural economics. May be repeated under a different subtitle to a maximum of six credits. A course may be offered twice under a given subtitle. Lecture, one to three hours; laboratory, zero to six hours per week.  Prereq:  ECO 201.

MUS 301 Appalachian Music. Instructor: Ronald A Pen.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  A survey of musical genre and styles in the Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between African American and European American contributions.

SOC 302-001 Soc Research Methods.  Instructor: Shannon Elizabeth Bell.  Meets:  TR 3:30 – 4:45 pm.   A focus on issues of social and behavioral research design, covering such topics as the relationship between theory and research, the ethics of social science research, units of analysis, identification of variables and statement of hypotheses, sampling, measurement, and modes of social observation. Prereq: Sociology majors and minors only. 

LIN 317-001 Language and Society: Language & Globalization.  Instructor:  Jennifer S Cramer.  Meets:  MWF 11:00 am – 11:50 am.  This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication.

AEC 324-401   Agricultural Law.  Instructor: Clinton R Quarles. Meets: T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm.  A study of legislation, administrative regulations, constitutions and court cases that have economic ramifications on agricultural and rural life.  Prereq: "C" or better in ECO 201.

ANT 325-001  Language and Culture.  Instructor:  Jennifer S. Cramer.  Meets:  MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. The course reviews the basic principles of linguistic analysis and examines the ways in which linguistic structures interact with and reflect cultural variation.

SOC 335-001  Sociology of Gender.  Instructor:  Shannon Elizabeth Bell.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  A sociological study of gender as a socially and culturally constructed phenomenon. Topics shall include the intersection of gender and race/ethnicity and class; sexualities; gender and social movements; sociological theories concerning gender; feminist theory; and research on the relevance of gender to various subfields of sociology.   Prereq: SOC 101 or CLD 102.

SOC 340  Community Interaction.  Instructor:  Lorraine E Garkovich.  Meets:  MW 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm.  Examines community effects on group and individual behavior from the perspective of sociological social psychology. By focusing on individuals, individuals in groups, and groups, special emphasis is given to how community context shapes the attitudes, beliefs, and actions of individuals as well as their interactions with others. Prereq: CLD 102 or SOC 101 or consent of instructor. Primary registration access limited to SOC and CLD majors and remaining seats open during secondary registration. 

ENG 359-001 The Kentucky Literary Heritage.  Instructor:  Erik A. Reece.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.   A course exploring the rich literary heritage of the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the greater Appalachian region, surveying its local history and diversity as well as its wider significance for American art. Authors covered can include early figures such as William Wells Brown, the first African-American novelist, and John Fox Jr., the first million-selling novelist; Robert Penn Warren, first Poet Laureate of the United States and author of All the King's Men; Elizabeth Madox Roberts; Harriette Arnow, winner of the National Book Award in 1954 for The Dollmaker; counter-cultural writers of the 60's and 70's such as Hunter S. Thompson, Gurney Norman, and Ed McClanahan; contemporary Kentucky writers such as Wendell Berry, Erik Reece, Bobbie Ann Mason, Sara Jeter Naslund, C. E. Morgan, Kim Edwards, and Gayle Jones; and contemporary award-winning poets such as Frank X Walker, Nikky Finney, and Maurice Manning. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.

CLD 360-001 or SOC 360-001  Environmental Sociology.  Instructor: TBD.   Meets:  MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.  A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice. 

EES 385-001  Hydrology and Water Resources.  Instructor:  Audrey H. Sawyer.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  The occurrence, movement, and quality of fresh water in the water cycle, including environmental problems and possible solutions. Case studies are explored through readings, videos, and required field trips. Prereq: GLY 220

AEC 424 Principles of Environmental Law.  Instructor: John K Schieffer.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.   Provides the student with a basic understanding of the principles of United States environmental law. Addresses the framework of the American legal system as it applies to environmental regulation. Covers the sources of environmental law and reviews major federal environmental statutes and judicial decisions addressing specific issues.  Prereq: "C" or better in ECO 201. 

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management.  Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  Lab Meets T 2:00 pm – 4:50 pm. Principles and techniques involved in watershed management as it relates to the practice of forestry. Emphasis is placed on understanding the hydrologic cycle, plant-soil interactions from a land-use and landscape perspective, and the need for implementation of forestry best management practices.  Prereq: CHE 104 or CHE 105, MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 200, and PLS 366. 

JOU 485 Community Journalism.  Instructor: Alvin Cross.  Meets Lecture W 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm, Lab TBD.  A study of all aspects of community news media, including editorial and business operations, and the conflicts that can arise between them, as well as the personal-professional conflicts that community journalists must manage to be successful in the field. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours of independent, advanced reporting and writing, for online and possible print publication. May also include photography and broadcast journalism.  Prerequisite:  JOU 301 or JOU 302.

CPH 601-001  Environmental Health.   Instructor:  Nancy E Johnson.  Meets: W 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CPH 601-201  Environmental Health.  Instructor:  David M Mannino.  Meets:  SA 8:00 am – 12:00 pm.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

GEO 722  Social Geography:  Critical GIS.  Instructor:  Matthew W. Wilson.  Meets:  W 5:00 pm – 7:45 pm.  Seminar in social geography, including, for example, race and gender, feminist geography, health care, disease and society; the geography of AIDS; the geography of aging and the life course; poverty and social policy; human behavior in space and time; population and migration studies; spatial structure of social networks; transportation of disadvantaged groups.  Prereq: Consent of instructor. 

EPE 798  Sem in Higher Education:  Sociology Ed.  Instructor:  Jane Jensen.  Meets:  W 11:00 am – 1:30 pm.  A critical study of selected problems in higher education. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits but no more than three credits may be earned under the same title.

 

SPRING 2013

Undergraduate

APP 200  Introduction to Appalachian Studies.  Instructor:  Dwight Billings, TA: Jenrose Fitzgerald.  Meets:  Lectures on MW 11:00-11:50 a.m. with various Wednesday, Thursday and Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.

GEO 321  Land, People, and Development in Appalachia.  Instructor:  Sarah Watson.  Meets:  Lecture MWF 12:00-12:50 pm.  The term "Appalachia" is used in multiple ways.  Encompassing the areas between southern New York State and the North eastern part of Mississippi, the term is often associated with various socio-economic and political meanings.  Additionally, it may refer to the physical geography of the mountains and foothills that fosters a diversity of unique ecologies.  This course will focus on the dynamic interplay between these meanings, power, wealth, biodiversity and landscape in shaping the cultural, economic and political history and geography of this region over the past 200 years.  Particular emphasis will be placed on examining the politics of representations, the socio-ecological issues that affect areas of the region, and some of the burgeoning conversations regarding the future of the region.   Prereq:  GEO 130, 152 or 172 or consent of instructor.  This course meets the A&S social sciences requirement.   

IAS 401-001  Perspectives in American Culture (Environmental Justice).  Instructor:  Shannon Bell.  Meets:  Lecture TR 3:30 – 4:45 pm.  This course examines pollution impacts and health effects in disadvantaged communities, environmental racism and classism, the interplay of gender and environmental injustice, climate injustice, community responses to environmental threats, the exporting of environmental hazards and pollution from the United States to the global South, and grassroots and community-based efforts to fight environmental threats (environmental justice movements). A significant component of this course will be a semester-long community-based research project that will require some out-of-class time and schedule flexibility to complete.

 

Undergraduate/Graduate

A&S 500-001  NGOs and the Politics of Humanitarian Aid.  Instructor:  Sasikumar Balasundaram.  Meets:  TR 2:00 – 3:15 pm, 247 White Hall Classroom Building.  This course will use a critical approach to examine the political nature of humanitarian aid. This course will provide students with a foundation for understanding humanitarian crises, how the international aid communities function, and the role of NGOs in humanitarian crises. Using cross-cultural examples, students will compare and contrast the roles, power, and politics of states and NGOs in humanitarian interventions. This course will offer an opportunity for students to understand development discourses and international aid.  In addition, we will also examine the challenges faced, and damages caused, by humanitarian regimes in the Global South and how aid-receiving communities respond to them. Requirements for undergraduates and graduate students will be different.  This course meets the A&S social science requirement, and requirements for the International Studies major and the new Global Studies certificate.

A&S 500-002  Global Appalachia.  Instructor: Ann Kingsolver.  Meets:  TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm, 342 White Hall Classroom Building.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which Appalachia has always had strong global connections, environmentally, economically, and culturally. Instead of seeing mountain regions as isolated, we will focus on the shared histories and concerns of communities in Appalachia and other mountain regions, including social and economic marginalization, resource extraction, low-wage industries, migration, and environmental challenges.  This course will also emphasize what can be learned from global mountain regions about sustainable livelihoods, community identity and action, and social capital at a time when the nation-states that have marginalized mountain communities now face some of the same challenges. This course will be linked, through the College of Arts & Sciences Connecting Classrooms Globally initiative, to a course at Delhi University focusing on the Himalayan region of India. Students at UK and Delhi University will do some of the same readings and will communicate with each other via a wiki.  There will be different requirements for graduate and undergraduate students in the course.  This course meets the A&S social science requirement, and requirements for the International Studies major and the new Global Studies certificate.

GEO 509  Applications of Geographic Systems.  Instructor:  Matthew W. Wilson.  Meets:  Lecture on TR 12:30 – 1:45 pm Geographic information technologies continue to drive the representation and management of complex as well as everyday spatial information.  As a result, increasing numbers of for-profit and non-profit organizations have recognized the need to transform their information into a spatial format.  The demand for collaborative and participatory skills in the use of these mapping tools has, of course, been furthered by this general trend.  Therefore, the goal for this course is that each student will become an independent and effective GIS user while developing their collaborative skills in the use of GIS for spatial analysis and representation.  To meet this goal, this course follows a participatory workshop model, drawing on Elwood (2009) -- an intensive, hands-on experience in which student teams use GIS in collaboration with community partners.  These partnerships will involve students in a full range of collaborative GIS: working with team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analyses, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses.  The lecture, reading, and seminar discussion components of the course will focus on topics important to collaborative development -- to be prepared to implement, manage, and apply in a variety of research and applications areas, and in multiple geographical and institutional contexts.  Prereq: GEO 309 or GEO 609  or consent of instructor.

SOC 517  Rural Sociology.  Instructor:  Rosalind P. Harris.  Meets:  Lecture on M 7:00 – 9:30 pm.  A sociological study of the issues relevant to rural communities. Topics may include transformations in rural communities; the agrifood system; and the natural environment in the U.S. and the world. Prereq: Graduate student status; undergraduates with consent of instructor only.  (Same as CLD 517)

SOC 534  Sociology of Appalachia.  Instructor:  Dwight B. Billings.  Meets:  Lecture on Tuesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm.  A soiological study of selected social issues facing Appalachian communities, with an emphasis on placing regional political economy, society and culture in a global context.  Prereq:  Sociology, Anthropology or CLD senior major or minor; Appalachian Studies minor; graduate student status; or consent of instructor.  (Same as ANT/CLD 534)

HIS 580  History of Appalachia.  Instructor:  Ronald D. Eller.  Meets: Lecture on TR 9:30 – 10:45 am.  A survey of the social, economic, and cultural history of Appalachia from the colonial period to the present with emphasis on the interaction of this social state region with the broader forces of social change at work in modern America.  Prereq: HIS 108, 109 or consent of instructor.

 

 

FALL 2012

CLD 102  The Dynamics of Rural Social Life.  Instructor:  Darryl Anthony Strode.  Meets:  TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm. Introduces major concepts of sociology by exploring social, political and cultural issues confronting rural society and American agriculture, such as: population change, industrialization, energy developments, agricultural change. Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 101.

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor:  Ann Kingsolver, TA: Amanda Fickey & Lizz New. Meetings & Times: Lectures on MW 10:00-10:50 a.m. with various Wednesday & Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.

ENS 200 Introduction to Environmental Studies. Instructor: Rebecca Claire Glasscock.  Meets: TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  A broad-ranging multidisciplinary introduction to current environmental issues and problem solving presented through a series of case studies. Case studies incorporate contemporary environmental themes including industrialization, resource use, and pollution; changing land use patterns; global warming and deforestation; biodiversity; political regulation; economic resources; cultural attitudes toward nature. Each case study will present environmental issues as scientific problems with social, political, philosophical, and economic causes and consequences. Emphasis is placed on understanding and combining different approaches to environmental problems and on proposing public policy solutions.

SOC 235-401 Inequalities in Society.  Instructor: Shaunna L Scott.  Meets: TR 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement. Analysis of the social origins, development, and persistence of inequality in various societies. One of the five modules for this course focuses on Appalachia.

CLD 260  Community Portraits.  Instructor:  Richard C Maurer.  Meets:  MWF 9:00 am – 9:50 am.  This course introduces the social science concept of community. The focus will be on definitions of community, and the different types of communities that exist in society. Students will gather and analyze information in real communities that represent different types of community.

APP 300 Appalachian English.  Instructor:  Jennifer Cramer.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm -12:50 pm. This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication. Course may be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

A&S 300 International Perspectives on Refugees and Humanitarianism.  Instructor: Sasikumar Balasundaram.  Meets: TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  This course will allow undergraduate students across the College of Arts and Sciences to learn from an international scholar in his area of expertise on international refugees and humanitarian aid. The course will meet the requirement for a social science elective. It has also been approved as meeting the distribution requirements for International Studies majors in the areas of Human Rights & Social Movements, International Relations, International Development, and East, South, and Southeast Asia. 

MUS 301 Appalachian Music. Instructor: Ronald A Pen.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  A survey of musical genre and styles in the Southern Appalachian region. Vocal and instrumental, sacred and secular materials will be covered, together with the interchanges between African American and European American contributions.

LIN 317-001 Language and Society: Appalachian Linguistics. Instructor:  Jennifer S Cramer.  Meets:  MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  This course will introduce students to various topics concerning the interaction between language use and social and cultural phenomena, including topics of language and cultural meaning, social segmentation, and linguistic variation, bi- and multi-lingual communities, and the ethnography of communication.

SW 320 Global Poverty: Response Across Cultures.  Instructor: Marie-Antoinette Sossou.  Meets: TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm.  An examination of poverty in various non-Western cultures. The course will cover the nature, scope, and distribution of poverty, definitions of poverty, common characteristics of the poor, as well as cultural traditions and folkways which contribute to the problem. Social welfare responses and humanitarian efforts which address the problem are examined.

AEC 324-401   Agricultural Law.  Instructor: Clinton R Quarles. Meets: T 6:00 pm – 8:45 pm.  A study of legislation, administrative regulations, constitutions and court cases that have economic ramifications on agricultural and rural life. Prereq: AEC 101.

SOC 340  Community Interaction.  Instructor:  Lorraine E Garkovich.  Meets:  MW 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm.  Examines community effects on group and individual behavior from the perspective of sociological social psychology. By focusing on individuals, individuals in groups, and groups, special emphasis is given to how community context shapes the attitudes, beliefs, and actions of individuals as well as their interactions with others. Prereq: CLD 102 or SOC 101 or consent of instructor. Primary registration access limited to SOC and CLD majors and remaining seats open during secondary registration. 

CLD 360 or SOC 360 Environmental Sociology.  Instructor:  John Johnson; Lisa M. Conley; Christopher S. Oliver.  Meets:  MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.  UK Core course – fulfills the Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA requirement.  A sociological study of the inter-relationship between human societies and the natural environment. Topics may include population growth; food systems; energy; climate change; risk perception; disasters; sustainability; social movements; and environmental justice. 

AEC 424 Principles of Environmental Law.  Instructor: John K Schieffer.  Meets: MWF 12:00 pm – 12:50 pm.   Provides the student with a basic understanding of the principles of United States environmental law. Addresses the framework of the American legal system as it applies to environmental regulation. Covers the sources of environmental law and reviews major federal environmental statutes and judicial decisions addressing specific issues.

PS 456G Appalachian Politics.  Instructor: Christopher Scott Rice.  Meets: MWF 9:00 am – 9:50 am.   A study of the interrelationships of the Southern Appalachian region and its people with the larger American political system, culture, and economy. Selective examination of public policies and major issues and their development in the politics of the region.

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology & Watershed Management.  Instructor: Christopher D. Barton.  Lecture Meets TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm.  Lab Meets T 2:00 pm – 4:50 pm.  Principles and techniques involved in forest watershed management as related to the water resource. The influence of forestry practices on water movement into and through the watershed; water storage; water loss, vegetation and water yields; water quality. All-day field trip required.

JOU 485 Community Journalism.  Instructor: Alvin Cross.  Meets W 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm.  A study of all aspects of small town and suburban newspapers, including editorial, advertising, circulation and management. Students will get the opportunity to do original reporting and research in Appalachian Kentucky.  This is an option available to individual students who demonstrate the ability to do the work and have the time to do the work in the field.  Travel support is provided.  Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours per week.  Interested students should see Instructor before enrolling Prereq: JOU/CLD 301.

AAS 523 (same as SW 523) Social Perspectives on Racism and Ethnic Prejudices in America. 2-3 credits. Instructor: Reiko Ozaki.  Meets: R 6:30 pm – 9:20 pm.  The course is designed to provide the knowledge needed in understanding the dynamics of institutional racism from a broader perspective of five specific ethnic minorities in rural and urban America. Particular emphasis is placed upon planned community change and strategies pertinent to minority group communities. Students who wish to make a special, in-depth study of one of the specified content areas may take this course for one additional credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EPE 525/773  Let’s See:  Approaching the History of Education through Photographs.  Instructor: Richard Angelo.  Meets: R 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm.  Open to beginning as well as advanced graduate students. Because it is a "seminar," the emphasis will be on original research. Alan Trachtenberg's Reading American Photographs: Images as History from Mathew Brady to Walker Evans (1989) is an early and outstanding example of what has become a burgeoning literature. Using appropriate secondary works as guide and inspiration, students will explore a topic of their choice that bears on history of education in Kentucky. The only requirement (aside from the final paper) is that the topic be rooted in one way or another in the photographic collections at our disposal here on campus or on line. (For a sample, see the "Brief Photo Essay on the History of Education in KY" on the EPE website: http://education.uky.edu/EPE/content/research-briefs).

CPH 601-001  Environmental Health.   Instructor:  Nancy E Johnson.  Meets: W 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

CPH 601-201  Environmental Health.  Instructor:  TBD.   Meets in classroom & online.  See schedule book.  An introduction to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing environmental health hazards that may adversely affect the health of current and future generations. Prerequisites: Undergraduate chemistry and biology, or permission of instructor.

ANT 637  Sociocultural Dimensions of Economic Development.  Instructor:  Hsain Ilahiane.  Meets:  M 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm.  This seminar examines anthropological and social science contributions to the understanding of development as well as the applications of social science knowledge in development programs. The course is designed to cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of development anthropology and to challenge students to think critically about development problems and processes.  Ideal for graduate students in agriculture, business, communications and information science, diplomacy, economics, geography, history, international development, political science, public health, and sociology.  For more information contact hsain.ilahiane@uky.eduor 859-257-6920

 

SPRING 2012

Undergraduate

APP 200 Introduction to Appalachian Studies. Instructor:  Dwight Billings,  TA: Catherine Herdman. Meetings & Times: Lectures on MW 2:00-2:50 p.m. with various Friday discussion sections (see Course Catalog) This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history, and society.  It will examine how and why the central and southern Appalachian Mountains came to be viewed as a distinct region, “Appalachia,” and it will examine Appalachia's place in American life.  We will encounter the region's rich traditions of music and literature; its rural social life including kinship and neighborhood institutions; coal mining history, community patterns, and labor struggles; gender; the experiences of Native Americans, African Americans, and Eastern Europeans in Appalachia; inequality and poverty; community politics and grassroots struggles; and current environmental issues including mountaintop removal coal mining.  

APP 300 Energy in Appalachia. Instructor: Jenrose Fitzgerald. Meets: TR. Time: 3:30-4:45 p.m. This course will critically examine diverse representations of Appalachia’s energy economy. Readings include a range of perspectives on the social, environmental, and economic implications of coal in the region, as well as on the potential of  renewable energy, energy efficiency, and other alternatives for diversifying the region’s energy portfolio in the 21st century.  A central focus of the course will be the development of skills to help  students critically analyze how energy issues in Appalachia are framed by differently positioned players, including journalists, scientists, engineers, social scientists, industry representatives, and environmental and social justice groups.  The first half of the course will examine a range of perspectives on the coal industry and its impacts on Appalachian communities, and the second half of the course will focus on strategies for shaping the region’s energy future.  

GWS 301-001 Crossroads of Gender, Class, and Race:  Trashy Literature. Instructor:  Carol Mason. Meets: TR. Time: 2:00-3:15 p.m. Have you ever been told, “Don’t read that trash”!?  Have you ever heard someone being called “white trash”?  This is a course that explores the cultural and political implications of such exclamations.  We will read literature by and about  people who are insensitively called white trash.  A term we usually take for granted as a mean derision, “white trash” will serve as an analytical category as we read fiction exploring what it means to be working-class, poor, and white in  twentieth-century America. We will contextualize the fiction in theories of class, gender, sex, and racialization, specifically the critical study of whiteness, and in regional history, including that of Appalachia. 

ANT 352:003 North American Cultures. Instructor: Mary Anglin. Meets: TR. Time: 2:00-3:15 p.m. This course uses readings, films, and music to explore the plurality of peoples and cultures in North America—with particular attention to the US.  We will look at youth cultures as sites of creativity and resistance, examine perennial problems in social equality, consider the similarities and differences between urban and rural ways of life, and explore environmental concerns as an integral part of making and sustaining culture. The goals of the course include gaining appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of cultures in North America, gaining awareness of and sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and understanding the distinctions between “race,” ethnicity, and racism. A number of the course readings are specifically Appalachia-focused.

APP 399 Appalachian Resource Sustainability Practicum. Instructor: Ann Kingsolver. Meets: Spring Break 2012. Sign up for one hour of APP 399 with Ann Kingsolver to enroll in this spring break service-learning course in Appalachian Kentucky. The entire course (1 credit hour, pass/fail) will be completed from March 11 to March 18 at the Robinson Forest facilities, which are part of UK’s Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability (http://www2.ca.uky.edu/rcars/) near Jackson, Kentucky. Students will learn about the history and future of natural resource use in the region including forestry, mining, and agriculture, with hands-on opportunities to work in a community garden, learn water quality testing techniques, and plan and carry out a small land reclamation project with an organization of young people in Magoffin County working toward sustainable livelihoods in the region. There will be interdisciplinary faculty participation from UK as well as opportunities to learn from discussions and activities with community members.  Transportation, lodging, and meals will be available to the group as part of the course; each student’s individual share of the expenses for lodging and meals will be capped at no more than $200 for the week.

ENG 482 Appalachian Literature. Instructor: Erik Reece. Meets: TR. Time: 12:30-1:45 p.m. In this course, we will examine the very rich literature —fiction, nonfiction, poetry, film and music — that has come from the mountains of Appalachia. While the region of Appalachia stretches from Alabama to New York State, our emphasis will be on the literature of central Appalachia — mainly the work of writers from Kentucky and West Virginia.

Undergraduate/Graduate

A&S 500 Special Topics: Global Appalachia. Instructor: Ann Kingsolver. Meets: TR. Time: 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. In this course, we will examine the ways in which Appalachia has always had strong global connections, environmentally, economically, and culturally.  We will critique isolationist discourse that has masked the shared concerns of those in Appalachia with other global regions that have been viewed as low-wage labor pools for transnational extractive industries, for example, and that have also contributed to collective knowledge about sustainable resource use and social capital. Appalachia’s global dimensions will be examined both historically and comparatively via topics ranging from local production of global commodities to migration, identity, changing land ownership, and community analyses and responses to the many processes discussed as globalization. The readings will include books by bell hooks, Roger Moody, Vandana Shiva, Eve Weinbaum, and other authors; required work will be different for undergraduate and graduate students.

GEO 509 GIS Workshop.  Instructor: Matthew Wilson. Meets: TR. Time: 12:30-1:45 p.m. Geographic information technologies continue to drive the representation and management of complex as well as everyday spatial information.  As a result, increasing numbers of for-profit and non-profit organizations have recognized the need to transform their information into a spatial format.  The demand for collaborative and participatory skills in the use of these mapping tools has, of course, been furthered by this general trend.  Therefore, the goal for this course is that each student will become an independent and effective GIS user while developing their collaborative skills in the use of GIS for spatial analysis and representation.  To meet this goal, this course follows a participatory workshop model, drawing on Elwood (2009) -- an intensive, hands-on experience in which student teams use GIS in collaboration with community partners.  These partnerships will involve students in a full range of collaborative GIS: working with team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analyses, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses.  The lecture, reading, and seminar discussion components of the course will focus on topics important to collaborative development -- to be prepared to implement, manage, and apply in a variety of research and applications areas, and in multiple geographical and institutional contexts.

GWS 595-001:  The Rural Queer. Instructor: Carol Mason. Meets: TR. Time: 11-00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. This advanced course explores how lesbian and gay historians and queer theorists have recently been theorizing the so-called rural queer. In addition to reading histories and ethnographies of actually existing GLBTQ people in rural communities, we will examine key concepts, cultural assumptions, and analytical categories that have come under scrutiny in the midst of recent scholarly inquiry. Among these are visibility, coming out, metronormativity, queer mobility, homonormativity, tolerance, and a variety of antigay concepts such as the ex-gay, the gay agenda, and the homosexual-as-terrorist. Our goal in examining these concepts is to map the scholarly inquiry into the rural queer – why such an inquiry arose and how it intersects with academic studies of globalization, critical regionalism, racial formation, social movements, and political rhetoric. This course is not recommended as a first course in sexuality studies.

CPH 644 Rural Health Disparities. Instructor: Robin Vanderpool. Meets: R. Time: 6-8:30.  Through class meetings, course readings, video presentations, field experiences, and assignments, this course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of issues pertaining to health disparities of rural populations by examining current programs and policies, relevant literature, public health practice, and quantitative and qualitative research pertaining to the health and well-being of rural populations. Many of the discussions and field experiences are Appalachia-based. No prerequisites.

Graduate 

MUS 702 Musicology Seminar: American Sacred Music Expression. Instructor: Ron Pen. Meets: W. Time: 3:30-6:00 p.m. Study and research in specific musicological problems. Music of the Appalachian region will be included in the content of the course, and student projects may be related to sacred music of Appalachia.  Prereq: Consent of instructor.

SOC 735 Seminar in Social Inequalities: Inequality in Appalachia. Instructor: Dwight Billings. Meets: T. Time: 7:00-9:30 p.m. This course is an elective in the Sociology Department’s program in Social Inequalities. While it is organized by a sociological framework, it is also intended to serve as a graduate level introduction to multidisciplinary scholarship in Appalachian Studies. We will examine a few “classic” and mostly recent studies to explore interpretive shifts, controversies, and debates in Appalachian Studies, especially as they relate to the study of race, class, and gender. Topics will include Appalachia’s discursive formation (its “discovery” in the late nineteenth century), the construction of “tradition,” controversies over the politics of culture, interpretations of the region’s social history and development, and other topics such as poverty, globalization, politics and activism, healthcare, religion, and the environment including mountaintop removal coal mining. A sub-theme will focus on the relationships between Appalachian Studies and other critical cultural studies including post-colonialism, subaltern studies, and the intersectionality of inequalities. Among the goals of the course will be to provide a context for the critical assessment of new works in Appalachian Studies as well as the space to begin work on a publishable or presentable paper in the field that might be submitted to for presentation at the Appalachian Studies annual conference or conferences in students’ home disciplines. In addition to works in sociology, we will read new contributions to Appalachian studies of inequality from Anthropology, English, Education, History, Geography, and Political Science.

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