Appalachian Studies Courses

For a list of Summer/Fall 2021 courses that can count towards the Appalachian Studies Minor/Certificate, click here: Fall 2021 App Related Course List

 

For a list of Winter Intersession/Spring 2021 courses that can count towards the Appalachian Studies Minor/Certificate, click here: Spring 2021 App-Related Courses Listing

 

Spring 2021 Featured App-Course Offerings

Spring 2021

APP 200-001: Introduction to Appalachian Studies (Hybrid)

Jan 26-May 13- Alisha Mays

TR 2-3:15

APP 200 Catalog Description

A multidisciplinary introduction to Appalachian culture, history and society. Examines how Appalachia came to be viewed as a distinct region; looks at its place in American life.

 
APP 300-001/HIS 351-006: "Appalachian Spirits: The History and Place of Moonshine in Appalachia’s Culture and Economy"
3 Credit Hours
Time: 11:00-12:15
Instructor: Carson Benn
Hybrid
 
APP 300 Course Description 
The image of moonshine remains indelibly linked to people of the Appalachian region, and Americans have maintained this cultural fascination with illicit spirits and Appalachian people ever since white settlers first inhabited the mountains. Various types of moonshine are produced and enjoyed all over the world, but in this course we will ask: why is moonshine such an Appalachian thing? We will span the region’s history and see how moonshine production has ebbed and flowed at times throughout United States’ history, observing also how the XXX bottle has veered between our ideas of virtue and vice across generations. In more recent times the culture of moonshine has been sold as a potential savior for the region’s economy, as businesses believe that the craft spirits boom can draw thirsty tourists to the mountains in droves. Will it pay off? Alcohol has been produced for hundreds of years in the mountains, but we must ask how this humble craft will affect the region through the twenty-first century.
 
APP 300-001/HIS 351-006: "Appalachian Spirits: The History and Place of Moonshine in Appalachia’s Culture and Economy"
3 Credit Hours
Time: 11:00-12:15
Instructor: Carson Benn
Hybrid
 
APP 300 Course Description 
The image of moonshine remains indelibly linked to people of the Appalachian region, and Americans have maintained this cultural fascination with illicit spirits and Appalachian people ever since white settlers first inhabited the mountains. Various types of moonshine are produced and enjoyed all over the world, but in this course we will ask: why is moonshine such an Appalachian thing? We will span the region’s history and see how moonshine production has ebbed and flowed at times throughout United States’ history, observing also how the XXX bottle has veered between our ideas of virtue and vice across generations. In more recent times the culture of moonshine has been sold as a potential savior for the region’s economy, as businesses believe that the craft spirits boom can draw thirsty tourists to the mountains in droves. Will it pay off? Alcohol has been produced for hundreds of years in the mountains, but we must ask how this humble craft will affect the region through the twenty-first century.
 

APP 395: Independent Study

1-6 Credit Hours - Lecture TBD-Location TBD– Instructor TBD

APP 395 Catalog Description

Independent Study of special topic under the supervision of Appalachian Studies-affiliated faculty. Students must identify both a topic for this project as well as a faculty mentor who has agreed to supervise this project. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.

Courses that have previously counted toward App Studies Program

Course Criteria for Appalachian Studies Minor or Certificate Courses

2018-2019 APP Course Bulletin Descriptions

Please note: Students may petition the Director of Appalachian Studies, Dr. Kathryn Engle, on individualized curriculum plans to fulfill the Appalachian Studies Minor or Undergraduate Certificate Requirements.

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